Joe Biden´s inauguration speech

The following sentence of Joe Biden’s inauguration speech immediately caught my attention:

But the American story depends not on any one of us, not on some of us, but on all of us, on we the people who seek a more perfect union.

Alarm bells started to ring in this teacher´s head because normally you wouldn´t say “depends on we” but: “depends on us”. Then I realized it was done on purpose to evoke the beginning of the Constitution: “We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union”

 

This preamble or introduction of the U.S. Constitution summarizes the who, why and what:

– who is adopting this Constitution: “We the People of the United States”,

– why it is being adopted: “in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity,”

– what is being adopted: “do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.”

All throughout Joe Biden´s speech* this preamble pops into memory. Let´s have a look at the different parts (words in white are parts of the preamble, Biden´s words are in italics):

form a more perfect Union: Unity is the central theme of Biden´s speech. Here are just two of the countless examples where unity is called for

And unity is the path forward. And we must meet this moment as the United States of America. If we do that, I guarantee you we will not fail. We have never, ever, ever, ever failed in America when we’ve acted together.

uniting our people, uniting our nation. And I ask every American to join me in this cause. Uniting to fight the foes we face (nice alliteration)

Another remarkable phrase uses the opposite of union: Disagreement must not lead to disunion

establish Justice: The dream of justice for all will be deferred no longer.

insure domestic Tranquility: And now a rise of political extremism, white supremacy, domestic terrorism that we must confront and we will defeat.

And here we stand just days after a riotous mob thought they could use violence to silence the will of the people, to stop the work of our democracy, to drive us from this sacred ground. It did not happen. It will never happen. Not today, not tomorrow, not ever. Not ever.

provide for the common defence: I will defend the Constitution. I’ll defend our democracy. I’ll defend America

promote the general Welfare: We can put people to work in good jobs. We can teach our children in safe schools. We can overcome the deadly virus. We can reward, reward work, and rebuild the middle class and make health care secure for all. We can deliver racial justice and we can make America once again the leading force for good in the world.

secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity: That America secured liberty at home and stood once again as a beacon to the world. That is what we owe our forebears, one another and generations to follow.

My dear reader, this comparison is not exhaustive in order not to bore you 😉 but it shows that the inauguration speech nicely covers all the points of the Constitution´s preamble.

*) You can find the complete text in this link  https://www.nytimes.com/2021/01/20/us/politics/biden-inauguration-speech-transcript.html

British humour

British humour is considered different from other countries’ humour and it is true, in many situations a British joke doesn’t translate well into for example Spanish. But what exactly makes it different? At the base of British humour are sarcasm and irony. Brits love irony because they are much too polite to be direct. When for example a bus arrives late, no one will tell the driver to his face that he is terribly late. It is much more likely to hear a Brit tell the driver something like: “I love it when the buses drive on time!”. He or she still means how terribly late the bus is, but by saying it ironically they can criticize without being offensive. And it works, all Brits will understand the irony, including the driver.

Brits like sarcasm and irony so much that it is almost always present in their conversations. And so are understatements and self-deprecation. All of these together can make talking to a Brit really funny. Even more so because most of them know how to keep a straight face while joking. Unfortunately it can make understanding a Brit for a foreigner really difficult too, because when you’re focusing on the main thread of the conversation, all these encrypted remarks will confuse you endlessly especially when the facial expression doesn’t tell you if these remarks are serious or not. So next time you hear a Brit saying something that really doesn’t make sense to you, he is probably joking.

Let me give you an example of an unexpected answer a Brit can give you to the seemingly normal question «how are you?»: «Fat, old and ugly»! Few Brits will resist a witty answer to a stupid question: you see a Brit fishing and you ask him if he just caught that fish that you see in his basket. He may say: “No, it’s a plastic model that I carry around for fun…”

Brits use a lot of understatements: «He is not too thin» while talking about an obese person, or «He knows a little about running a company» while talking about a successful CEO. Did you ever notice that there are in fact a lot of understatements in British English? If you pay attention you will hear “actually”, “a bit”, “quite” and “rather” all the time!

Brits love self-deprecation. They like it so much they tend to admire people who use it a lot more than people who boast about themselves. What is self-deprecation? According to the Cambridge dictionary: “Trying to make yourself, your abilities, or your achievements seem less important.” Here’s a funny example: you’re looking for a good hairdresser, so you ask a stranger on the street for one and he or she says: “Would I look like this if I knew one?”

One last type of British humour that I want to mention is teasing. Brits tease a lot, but it is never meant to hurt someone, it is more a signal of acceptance and admiration. A Brit would never tease you if he didn’t like you. So don’t worry if you do something clumsy at work and your boss shouts out in exasperation: “Oh you can’t get decent staff these days!”

I hope you will be able to understand British humour after reading this. I’m afraid there’s no course in seeing the fun in British humour, but I think you will see it if you’re exposed to it long enough! And if not, you will most certainly improve your listening skills in the process.

Joris

Living off the grid

Here at Eloquentia we live in a remote farmhouse as you can see in the pictures on the website.  Living remote means living far away from all kinds of services. Far away from the water supply, far away from natural gas and far away from power lines. In English you can say: the house isn’t on the mains. Mains means ‘the system of pipes or wires that carry water or electricity into a house’. You can also say the house is off-grid. It’s off the grid, it’s not connected to any network (=red).

How is it to live off-grid? Well, I have to say we’re quite comfortable with it and we hardly notice any disadvantages. Okay, it’s perhaps more comfortable to be on the mains, like most people are, but in our case it’s definitely environmental friendlier. So, how do we supply ourselves with electricity? I will start answering this question with some vocabulary: in Spanish you say ‘luz’, but in English you can´t use the word ‘light’ in this context. The two most common words to use in English are power and electricity. Here at Eloquentia we use solar panels and solar batteries. It’s a photovoltaic system: the solar panels transform sunlight into electricity which is then stored in big batteries where it stays until we need it in the house.

solar panels in front of Eloquentia farm house
Solar panels at intensivos de inglés Eloquentia

The capacity of the batteries is not unlimited like mains electricity, so we have to be aware of our power consumption, especially when it’s cloudy. Besides, it is better not to use big power consumers like a dishwasher, an electric oven or a hair dryer. And what happens if there is no sun for a couple of days? Well, if we save power we can survive three days on full batteries. If it is still cloudy on the fourth day we have to connect a generator to the batteries to charge them.

What about our water supply? Since we don’t receive any water from the village, we collect our own rainwater from the roof. We have four storage tanks around the house where we store the rainwater. It usually rains here only in autumn and spring so it’s important to have full tanks at the start of the summer season. One tank is specifically for the house and we make sure to keep this water clean at all times by disinfecting it. We use the other three tanks to store water for the decorative garden and the vegetable garden.

We use firewood to heat the house and a solar boiler to get hot water. The solar boiler produces enough hot water for the kitchen and the four bathrooms, especially in summer,  the season when most of our guests are present. So don’t we use gas at all? Yes, we do use gas for cooking and as a back-up for the solar boiler when there’s not enough sunlight.

Despite the disadvantages of not being on the mains we are very happy. So if Endesa or one of the other Spanish power companies offers us a free connection to their supply, we will definitely say to them: «No thank you, we prefer to stay off-grid!»

Brand new website and blog!

Welcome to our brand new website and blog. The website and the blog are new but Eloquentia is not. Oh no! We started back in 2007, so we have been giving intensive English courses in Spain for 10 years now! And because we like doing them so much, we will continue for many more years from now.

«and the times they are a changin»

So why a new website and blog? Well 10 years is a long time «and the times they are a changin», to quote Bob Dylan. Websites nowadays need to be responsive to be viewable at all the different devices and we can proudly say that the Eloquentia website www.intensivoingles-eloquentia.es is now ready for that. And as we’re modernising it, we have decided to start a blog to share some of the interesting, beautiful, funny or tricky things that involve the English language and culture, or are connected to our courses.

What’s in a name

Cuadro Gema Noguera Eloquentia cursos intensivos de inglés

An example of an interesting item that is connected to our courses is the name of our business: Eloquentia. It comes from Latin and means eloquence. Maybe that doesn’t help you much, so a translation into normal English would be: being skillful with words.

In Spanish it does exist as well: «elocuencia» and the official definition can be seen in this painting, made in January 2007 by our dear late friend Gema Noguera from Beceite:

«Facultad de hablar o escribir de modo eficaz para deleitar y conmover, y especialmente para persuadir a oyentes o lectores. Y todo aquel que posea dicha facilidad tiene el deber moral de intentar transmitirla.»

It pretty much reflects the core of our business: in Eloquentia’s courses we train Spanish adults to put the English that they have been studying skillfully into practice.

logo eloquentia inglés y másIt may be obvious that the same painting inspired us in 2007 to design the Eloquentia logotype.

 

Well that’s it, our first entry in the new blog. We hope you enjoyed it. Stick around, there will be many more entries soon!

Joris